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The Sun Magazine

Contributors

August 2009

Writers

Eric Anderson lives with his family in Elyria, Ohio. He says, “The pronunciation of ‘Elyria’ is a cross between ‘delirium’ and ‘malaria,’ which is a pretty fitting description of August in Ohio.”

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Compton Gardner is the pseudonym of a writer who finds joy in chopping wood while listening to audio books.

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Lois Judson is a writer who lives in Vermont with her boyfriend and her neurotic cat. She is amazed to discover that getting sober has left her with writer’s block, so she spends her time quilting, gardening, and admiring the mushrooms that grow in her yard.

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Jane Roberts

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Hannah Tennant-Moore’s essays have appeared in the Gay and Lesbian Review Worldwide, Tricycle, and Turning Wheel. She is an MFA candidate in the Bennington Writing Seminars and lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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Cole Thompson lives on a small ranch in Laporte, Colorado, where he raises llamas. His work has appeared in B&W, Focus, and Photographer’s Forum.

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Cynthia Weiner lives in New York City, where she is assistant director of the Writers Studio. Her work has been published in epiphany, Open City, and Ploughshares and has won a Pushcart Prize. She is working on a collection of short stories.

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Joe Wilkins’s writing has appeared in the Georgia Review, the Southern Review, and Orion. Born and raised on a sheep ranch in Montana, he now lives in Forest City, Iowa, where he directs the writing program at Waldorf College and takes walks along the Winnebago River with his dog, Johnny Cash.

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Angela Winter has been dreaming about feathers, nests, and owls. She lives in a small house with a robin’s-egg blue kitchen in Carrboro, North Carolina, and works at The Sun.

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Photographers

Robert Alexander lives in Ormond Beach, Florida, and is an editor at the Daytona Beach News-Journal. His photographs have been published in Time, Parade, and the New York Times. He says he’d like to be a writer, but he finds photography easier: “I take pictures of people and places I would write about, if I were better at it.”

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Kerry Deehan lives in Oakland, California. Her photograph in this issue is her first published work, and she says, “I can’t stop gazing adoringly at my acceptance letter.”

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Blake Dieters moved from Colorado to Sarasota, Florida, and is still making the adjustment from pine trees to palm trees.

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Gautam Narang’s work has been published in National Geographic, and he lives in London.

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Doug Rhinehart is a retired community-college administrator and part-time photography instructor who lives in Woody Creek, Colorado.

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Richard Robinson’s work has appeared in Smithsonian, National Geographic Traveler, and the Washington Post. He lives in Orange, Virginia.

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Carol Samour lives with her husband and two cats in Germantown, Maryland. Her photographs have been published in Kalliope, Shots, and Antietam Review.

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Mark Vesuvio was a rapper for fifteen years and worked with Eminem and the Black Eyed Peas. He is now a record producer living in Brooklyn, New York.

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Louanne Watley lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where her work is archived at the University of North Carolina. Her photographs have been published in the Carolina Quarterly, Calyx, and North Carolina Literary Review.

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Dave Westover is a freelance photographer and graphic designer whose photo­graphs of dragonflies have appeared in field guides and on the websites of two universities and the U.S. Geological Survey. He lives in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin.

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On The Cover

Monica Denevan lives in San Francisco, California, and is represented by Scott Nichols Gallery. She has been traveling to Burma yearly since 2000 to photograph the people who live and work on the Irrawaddy River and nearby lakes. She took this month’s cover photograph outside the Burmese city of Mandalay. She asked her friend to walk out in the thigh-deep water and stand on a partially submerged stump. It was late in the day, when the lake was perfectly still and the light was warm.

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