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The Sun Magazine

Contributors

January 2011

Writers

Norman Cousins

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Alan Craig is the pseudonym of an aging runner who lives in Massachusetts with his wife and their three dogs, all of whom are faster than he is.

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Brian Doyle is the editor of Portland Magazine and the author of ten books, most recently Mink River (Oregon State University Press), which he hopes someday will be considered the fourth-best Oregon novel ever. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

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Lois Judson lives in New England, where she works with the elderly in their homes and is at war with her rooster.

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David Kupfer’s writing has been recently published in the Progressive and Bay Nature. He lives in northern California and is the creator of the Green Map for San Francisco.

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Ed Meek’s poem in this issue is from his collection What We Love (Blue Light Press/1stWorld Publishing), and his fiction and poetry have appeared in the Paris Review, the Cream City Review, and the North American Review. He lives in Somerville, Massachusetts, where he is training for the Boston Marathon.

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Brenda Miller has received five Pushcart Prizes and is the author of the essay collections Blessing of the Animals (Eastern Washington University Press) and Season of the Body (Sarabande Books). She lives in Bellingham, Washington, where she is a professor of English at Western Washington University and editor in chief of the Bellingham Review.

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Wolf Pascoe is a physician, poet, and playwright who is working on a book of essays about anesthesia. He lives with his wife and their eight-year-old son in California and chronicles his attempts to get fatherhood right on his blog, Just Add Father.

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Sy Safransky is editor and publisher of The Sun.

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Annie Weatherwax was the 2009 winner of the Robert Olen Butler Fiction Prize, and her stories have appeared in the Southern Review, Other Voices, and Quarterly West. She is a painter and sculptor who has sculpted characters for Nickelodeon, DC Comics, and Pixar. She lives in Boston, Massachusetts.

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Photographers

Rita Bernstein used to be considered the least artistic member of her family because she couldn’t draw. Her photography is represented by galleries in San Francisco, Houston, New York, and in Philadelphia, where she lives in a two-hundred-year-old house.

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William Carter’s newest book, Causes and Spirits, is due out from Steidl next month. More than 150 of his photographs are in the permanent collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum. He lives in Los Altos Hills, California.

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Michael Galinsky is a photographer, filmmaker, and musician who lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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Reinhard Gorn is a commercial photographer and photography teacher living in Berlin, Germany.

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Jarrod McCabe’s photographs have recently appeared in Maine. He lives in Framingham, Massachusetts.

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G. Alan Myers likes to cook up a mean spaghetti Bolognese when he’s not working on new portraits. He lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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Doug Rhinehart’s first book of photographs is Desert Adagio (People’s Press). He is a retired community-college administrator and photography instructor who lives in Woody Creek, Colorado.

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Paul Rozycki has been a photographer for more than fifty years. He is a professor of political science at Mott Community College and lives in Flint, Michigan.

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Rosie Saraga knew she wanted to be a photographer when she was four years old and looked through the viewfinder of her father’s camera. She lives in Corvallis, Oregon.

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James Sedwick is a poet, photographer, and public-school mental-health counselor in Buffalo, New York. He has been taking photographs of water for several years, which he attributes to his being a Pisces and an out-of-shape swimmer.

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On The Cover

Cole Thompson is a fine-art photographer living in northern Colorado. He took this month’s cover photo (as well as the photos on the contents page and inside back cover) in July 2008. The subject, Linnie Krauland, had a rare breast cancer for which she had undergone a mastectomy and chemotherapy treatment as well as alternative therapies such as reiki. At the time she feared she would not live to the end of the year. She asked Thompson to photograph her and her mastectomy because, she says, “no one wants to look at it, even though almost everyone has known someone with breast cancer. I wanted to show people what it really is.” Today her doctors detect no cancer, her hair has grown back, and she is enjoying life in Colorado.

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