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The Sun Magazine

Contributors

November 2004

Writers

Rachel J. Elliott is The Sun’s photo and editorial assistant. She lives in Carrboro, North Carolina.

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Steven Philip Gehrke’s second book of poetry, The Pyramids of Malpighi (Anhinga Press), won the Philip Levine Prize. He lives in Columbia, Missouri.

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Danusha Veronica Goska lives in Paterson, New Jersey. After suffering from perilymph fistula for many years, she underwent a surgery that eliminated her symptoms, and she is now in the job market. Her novel, Love Me More: An Addict’s Diary (Xlibris Corporation), is available from Amazon.

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James Janko’s story in this issue is part of a novel titled Buffalo Boy and Geronimo, which is forthcoming from Curbstone Press in February 2006.

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Alison Luterman lives in Oakland, California. She has a new website, and her second book of poems, See How We Almost Fly, is forthcoming in 2005. She is currently looking for a theater company to produce her play Saying Kaddish with My Sister.

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Susan Luzzaro lives with her family in Chula Vista, California. Her essays have been published in Puerto del Sol and Under the Sun, and in an anthology titled Getting By: Stories of Working Lives (Bottom Dog Press).

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Erin Van Rheenen divides her time between California and Costa Rica. She has taught writing at City College of New York and in the San Francisco County Jail. She has a new book titled Living Abroad in Costa Rica (Avalon Travel Publishing).

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Bruce Holland Rogers lives in Eugene, Oregon. His most recent story collection is Thirteen Ways to Water (Panisphere Books).

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Lee Rossi lives in Los Angeles and is author of the wildly popular poetry volume Ghost Diary (Terrapin Press). Now that their kids are in school, he and his wife will be contestants on Seven-Year Itch, a married-couples version of the reality-TV series Temptation Island. Tune in to see if they manage to stick together.

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Sy Safransky is editor of The Sun.

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Photographers

Geoff Oliver Bugbee is a freelance photographer based in Louisville, Kentucky. His work has taken him to India, Tibet, and Nepal to study curable blindness in the developing world.

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Cybelle Codish is a Detroit-based photojournalist who has spent half her life behind the camera and in the darkroom, and still practices the traditional art of processing and printing by hand.

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Sometimes called the “rock-and-roll photographer of Iowa City,” Sandra Louise Dyas photographs musicians, rural culture, and the people of Iowa.

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Bill Emory lives in the Rappahannock and James River watersheds of Virginia. When he was young he took pictures of his friends. In middle age he took pictures of his daughters. Now he waits for visions to come to him.

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Doug Fath can often be found standing in small towns with his Hasselblad camera, getting strange looks. He lives in Madison, Wisconsin.

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Martin Fishman is a photographer living in Brooklyn, New York.

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Sarah Hadley lives in Chicago and loves taking photographs in the rain.

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Robert Hecht is a photographer living in San Francisco. Photography helps him to be continually surprised by the world.

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Nancy Hill is a photographer living in Portland, Oregon. Her photograph in this issue was taken in a warehouse filled with discarded mannequins.

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Keith Harmon Snow is a journalist, photographer, writer, and human-rights investigator whose Africa reporting won a Project Censored award in 2003. He lives in Williamsburg, Massachusetts.

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Photographer Karen Tweedy-Holmes makes portraits of bugs, beasts, buildings, plants, people, and large rock formations. She lives in New York City, but vanishes into the desert every chance she gets.

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Eloise Warren is a photographer living in Somerville, Massachusetts.

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On The Cover

Photographer Lauren Goodsmith is the author of The Children of Mauritania: Days in the Desert and by the River Shore (Carolrhoda Books). A native New Yorker, she currently lives in Baltimore, Maryland, with her cat and her horse. She took this month’s cover photograph in the late 1980s in the Kashmir Valley between India and Pakistan. She visited the region during a period of high tension, with both Indian and Pakistani forces conducting military drills nearby. Though cautioned that the Kashmiri people were inhospitable to outsiders, she found the opposite to be true. The woman on the cover invited Goodsmith into her home for some salt tea (similar to bouillon), and the photographer took her picture by the light coming in through the solitary window.

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