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The Sun Magazine

Contributors

July 2009

Writers

James Baldwin

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Akhim Yuseff Cabey was raised in the Bronx and now lives in Columbus, Ohio, where he will spend the summer gardening, grilling, and golfing. He won a Pushcart Prize in 2008 and is currently working on a memoir called Little Red Love Machine.

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David Cook lives with his wife and two small children in a cabin in Walden, Tennessee, and teaches high-school courses on democracy, justice, and American history in nearby Chattanooga. He is working on a biography of a Gregorian monk who lives and works among the urban homeless.

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Adrie Kusserow lives with her husband and two children on the land where she was raised in Underhill Center, Vermont. She is the author of a collection of poems titled Hunting Down the Monk (BOA Editions) and is working on a second collection about her time in Sudan. She teaches at St. Michael’s College.

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Teddy Macker lives on an old farm in Carpinteria, California. His writing is forthcoming in Antioch Review, Court Green, and Poetry East.

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Beth Mayer’s work has appeared in the Threepenny Review and the Journal of Graduate Liberal Studies. She performs with the organization TalkingImage Connection and teaches writing at Metropolitan State University. She lives in Lakeville, Minnesota.

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Rochelle Smith is from Trinidad and Tobago, has traveled to Scotland four times, and currently lives in Moscow, Idaho. She dedicates her essay in this issue to her grandmother, who recently passed away at the age of ninety-seven.

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Martin Steingesser lives in Portland, Maine, where he is the city’s first poet laureate. He has published a book of poems, Brothers of Morning (Deerbrook Editions), and a CD, The Thinking Heart, which is a performance piece in two voices and cello based on the writings of a Dutch woman who died in the Holocaust.

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Morgan Tyree, who lives in Powell, Wyoming, rode with and photographed a trucker for eight thousand miles through twenty states last summer. His work has appeared in Montana Quarterly and Referee. He is seeking a book publisher for his photographs of high-school football.

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Christian Zwahlen’s short stories have appeared in Open City. He lives with his family in Rochester, New York, and is currently at work on a novel.

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Photographers

Diana Hooper Bloomfield lives in Raleigh, North Carolina, where she teaches photography. Although she holds a master’s degree in English literature and creative writing, these days she prefers to tell stories in images.

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James Carroll lives in New York City.

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George Collier sings in a choir and lives with his wife and their two cats in Richmond, Virginia.

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Susi Eggenberger likes to hike the hut-to-hut system in the White Mountains and float on Daicey Pond in Baxter State Park. She lives in Arundel, Maine.

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Ethan Hubbard is the author of Salt Pork & Apple Pie (RavenMark), a collection of essays and photographs celebrating a disappearing generation of farmers, loggers, and others who live close to the land. He lives in Chelsea, Vermont.

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Clemens Kalischer was born in Bavaria and has been taking photographs for sixty years. He lives in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, where he runs the Image Gallery and maintains Image Photos, an archive of more than a half-million pictures.

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Kayo Lackey was born and raised in Japan and has lived in Portland, Oregon, since 1997.

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Anna Kaufman Moon’s photographs have appeared in Newsweek, Life, and the New York Times, as well as Abbie Hoffman’s Steal This Book. She lives in Cobleskill, New York.

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Marilyn Szabo loves being in the water and sometimes wonders why she lives in the desert city of Phoenix, Arizona.

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On The Cover

Bruce Horowitz is a psychotherapist who lives in Rochester, New York. He was walking down the street there in the 1970s when he saw the mother and daughter in this month’s cover photograph. He asked if he could take their picture.

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