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Social Justice

Essays, Memoirs, & True Stories

Peace Nigger’s Long March

A Pedestrian Journal

After quitting his job on public television last year, David Grant decided to maintain a month of silence. This journal was written during the last two weeks, when he travelled on foot, carrying a petition calling for military disarmament. His only companion was his goat, little Iowa, who carried provisions.

By David Grant August 1979
Essays, Memoirs, & True Stories

Crimes To Fit The Individual: South African Justice

The destruction of the liberal, moderate left, both black and white, has brought apartheid to its logical conclusion, the polarization of the races. Each color is increasingly influenced by the voice of extremism. South Africa is now poised on the brink of guerilla war.

By William Gaither September 1977
Essays, Memoirs, & True Stories

Relative Poverty And Frugality

The attempt of this essay is to show relative poverty not as an expedient toward a certain goal but as the brick and mortar for the construction of a condition of equity and transcendence through a lean ecological-theological congruence.

By Paolo Soleri July 1977
Essays, Memoirs, & True Stories

Afrikaner

Following through on an attempt to understand white South Africa’s control and manipulation of the Black/Colored/Asian majority is a journey that invokes a logical progression of disbelief sliding to horror, then, finally, a half step beyond to revulsion.

By William Gaither July 1977
Essays, Memoirs, & True Stories

The Republicans’ Nasty Little Screed

The Republican platform, in and of itself, is simply a nasty little screed, conceived in a moment of disappointment by the forces of Reagan. The monster off-spring of the reactionary right, it is loved only by its parents.

By William Gaither October 1976
Essays, Memoirs, & True Stories

The New Age: Who Dares Believe It?

I remember when we dressed in silks, all hair and bells and sweet hallucination, and the bird that rose in our chest we called freedom, and let fly. It was the demand air made of us, and we made a fashion of the wind, sweeping, gliding, curving it to our needs.

By Sy Safransky April 1975